1 Mazahn

A Rose For Emily Tone Essay

The Effects of Tone in "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner

658 Words3 Pages

The story "A Rose for Emily" is one of first William Faulkner’s publications. The action of this story takes place in a time filled with social and political turmoil, when Southern came into a historical lethargy, and when its glow start faded. The elements presented in "A Rose for Emily" make reference to that time and are a tribute to Mss. Emily Graiser. A dominant tone is shown by a footprint of the past and loneliness to which was added symbolism and melancholia. The author showed us through his words issue of life, love and death, a sensitivity which gets us closer of characters' life and struggles.
The story begins with the death of Emily Graiser- the main character- and the action is presented backwards and gradually her life and…show more content…

The story "A Rose for Emily" is one of first William Faulkner’s publications. The action of this story takes place in a time filled with social and political turmoil, when Southern came into a historical lethargy, and when its glow start faded. The elements presented in "A Rose for Emily" make reference to that time and are a tribute to Mss. Emily Graiser. A dominant tone is shown by a footprint of the past and loneliness to which was added symbolism and melancholia. The author showed us through his words issue of life, love and death, a sensitivity which gets us closer of characters' life and struggles.
The story begins with the death of Emily Graiser- the main character- and the action is presented backwards and gradually her life and action from the time she was young until she died. The story is narrated from the town's point of view which has a great attention on Graiser family, a wealthy family for which there is great respect, not only because they were rich also because of its history being the oldest family of that region.
The imposing house presented at the beginning of the story is a very important element and was presented as "squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies, set on what had once been our most select street. But garages and cotton gins had encroached and obliterated even the august names of that neighborhood; only Miss Emily's house was left,

Show More

Confessional, Gossipy

The narrator of "A Rose For Emily" is a stand-in for people of Jefferson, and the tone the narrator adopts reflects the two sides of the Jeffersonian nature. Remember, this is a community that both cares for and alienates Miss Emily—and the narration reflects that. At times, we're given a front row seat to the gossip-feat of small-town Southern life, and at times the narration suggests deep remorse.

The chilling first line of Section IV is a good representative of both of these characteristics at once:

So the next day we all said, 'She will kill herself'; and we said it would be the best thing. (4.1)

The fact that the community collectively decides that Miss Emily is going to commit suicide shows you just how rampant this gossip is—nothing is scared when it comes to dishing. But because the narrator not only admits to gossiping about Miss Emily, but also suggesting that suicide is the best course of action, this passage becomes confessional. We now know the sins of the people of Jefferson, and they reveal themselves to be small-minded and morbid.

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *